Curriculum update2018-03-20T14:40:13+00:00

Design Sprint: Physiotherapy Robots

Introduction

Robots are quickly becoming more functional, more practical, and more affordable. One of the most popular items at the recent Consumer Electronics Show was companion robots; robots that fit seamlessly into people’s daily life. As this trend continues we will see more robots appearing in many service industries. There are already robots acting as concierges in hotels, delivering food, and supporting workers with manual handling. These robots can fill gaps in staffing numbers and free up humans to complete tasks requiring more creativity or personal interaction.

Program Summary

Students will be presented with a challenge around using robotics to help get people doing more physical activity. They will begin by learning a simple way to program the Robotis Bioloid Premium, a humanoid robot. Students will then use this knowledge to program the robot to demonstrate a range of exercises for people to follow. This is a taster program designed to link with the ‘Physiotherapy Program Development’ program.

Design Immersion: Physiotherapy Program Development

Introduction

Physiotherapists are in demand. With both an aging and more health conscious population this demand is likely to continue increasing, and there will be strong growth in the industry.  This increase in demand will potentially lead to a gap between the demand for the service and the availability of physiotherapists. Technology has already become ubiquitous in our lives. There are currently over 4.7 billion mobile phone user in the world and robotic companions are becoming more popular. Can harnessing some of this technology provide a solution?

Program Summary

This program will challenge students to work in a group to develop a physiotherapy program that can be used when a physical physiotherapist is not available. Students will have a variety of choices around how they design and deliver this program using a variety of technologies. They can design an app, program a robot, or use other technology to achieve their goal. This program is about using the design thinking process to ensure they meet the needs of the clients.

Design Sprint: Back in the Game

Introduction

The Food and Fibre industry is one of the most important in Gippsland with over 4,800 farms generating around $2 billion of agricultural production per year.  One of the challenges of this industry is the aging workforce. This aging workforce and farm related accidents mean that some farmers are finding it difficult to complete parts of their everyday work. Advances in technology, especially robotics, have the potential to greatly affect this industrial sector by doing jobs that people do not want to or are unable to do. This technology has already started to influence our area with autonomous agricultural drones and GPS guided, self-driving tractors already in use in Gippsland.

Program Summary

Students will be immersed in Virtual Reality to hear stories from local farmers who have become restricted in the jobs they are able to do because of age, accident, or disability. From this experience, students will work in teams to identify a challenge and create a problem statement which will form the focus of their project. In their teams they will design, build, program, and test a solution using Thymio robots. To conclude the day, students will present their prototype and the challenges they faced.

Design Immersion: Renewable Energy Car Race

Introduction

The face of energy in the Gippsland region in undergoing change. This has been seen with the closure of the Hazelwood Power Station and the increase in solar, wind, and geothermal energy generation. There is also world-wide pressure to reduce emissions and move towards a greener future. Iceland, Costa Rica, and Uruguay have already achieved over 90% of their energy being generated by renewable sources. Closer to home, the Victorian government has set a target of 25% renewable energy production by 2020, increasing to 40% by 2025[1].

Program Summary

Over the course of three days students will be introduced to a variety of different types of renewable energy. They will investigate the advantages and disadvantages of solar, wind, geothermal, and hydro energy, conducting experiments with each energy type. They will then use this learning to design, build, and test a car powered by renewable energy. The program will conclude with a race between students’ designs and a reflection on their learning through the program.

Design Immersion: Rapid Prototyping Challenge

Introduction

Workplace injuries are a major concern for industries. As well as the personal pain, suffering, and loss of wages they cause, workplace injuries have a major impact on businesses and the Australian economy. Each year there are over 100,000 serious worker compensation claims in Australia. Both the average time and compensation paid for these claims is increasing.  Something needs to be done to help workers and businesses.

Gippsland is home to a world leader in dock products and lifting solutions. They have designed solutions for major supermarkets and retailers that help improve efficiency and reduce manual handling injuries. Their work is reducing the number of worker injuries and compensation claims, a benefit for businesses and workers.

Program Summary

Students will be presented with a scenario from an industry partner. From this scenario they will use the design thinking process to identify a problem which they will work to solve. Students will then learn about rapid prototyping using advanced manufacturing techniques including 3d printing, laser cutting, CNC, and electronics. They will use these skills to design, build, and test a prototype solution. This solution will then be evaluated against their original problem and the customer’s needs identified at the start of the project. Students will also present their solutions for feedback.

Design Immersion: Flat Pack Furniture Challenge

Introduction

We often hear that students are being prepared for jobs that don’t yet exist. While this is true, there are certainly skills that employers currently and will continue to look for. The ability to work within guidelines, meet customer needs, and communicate ideas are employable skills that won’t change.

Companies are also often looking to reduce the prices of transport and shipping. One way to do this is using flat packs. These are packs that ship in flat boxes but that can be put together into large items. IKEA are one of the most famous users of this method but there are many others.

Program Summary

Students will use their maths skills to design a piece of flat pack furniture within the requirements set out by the customer. Students will be presented with an interview from the customer from which they will need to identify the design requirements. They will use CAD software to design their product before manufacturing using the laser cutter or CNC machine.

On day 2, students will design a campaign to market and sell their product focusing on the use of persuasion and new technologies to improve their marketing.

Industry Tech Taster

Introduction

Technology is a disruptive force which has always led to changes in the way that people work and the types of jobs that are in demand. This change is happening more and more rapidly with the increased pace of technological development. We have seen rapidly changing technology and a reduction in traditional industries have a dramatic impact on Gippsland. This means that today’s students need to develop skills that will allow them to be adaptable and to meet unforeseen challenges and opportunities in their lives. They also need to be open to new experiences and to have an understanding of how the world of work is changing around them.

Program Summary

Students will be provided with an introduction to how technology is influencing and changing many of the local industries in Gippsland. They will learn about the change technology is causing before rotating through a brief session about three major technologies; 3d design and laser cutting in advanced manufacturing, virtual reality training programs in food and fibre, and robotics in the health industry. The day will also include information on the changing workforce from the Foundation for Young Australians.

Design Sprint: Make Me Safer

Introduction

While workplace health and safety continues to be a priority for businesses, there are jobs that always come with an element of risk to the people undertaking them. There are many industries in Gippsland that involve working at heights, in confined space, or with hazardous chemicals. While companies try to reduce these risks through training and safety equipment, the risk is always there while humans are carrying out these tasks. The use of robotics to remove humans from these dangerous environments is one possible solution.

Program Summary

Students will learn about some of the riskier jobs undertaken in the Gippsland area. They will learn about the people doing these jobs and the parts of their jobs that pose the most risk. Based on this information, they will develop and propose a solution to make one of these jobs safer through the use of robotics. Students will use the Thymio robots and peripheries that they build using the makerspace materials to create their solutions.

STEAM Program: Virtual Art

Introduction

Imagine soaring through the air like a bird without leaving the ground. Imagine exploring ancient ruins or the bottom of the ocean from the comfort of your couch. Imagine creating sculptures and works of art in zero gravity. Virtual reality (VR) is making all of these things possible, and it is just the beginning. VR is a rapidly growing technology that is allowing people to be limited only by their imagination. It is creating opportunities for artists that were not previously possible. With the market for virtual reality predicted to grow to $180 billion dollars by 2020, a knowledge of VR creation will unlock a whole new world of possibilities.

Program Summary

Students will be given an opportunity to take part in the virtual creation of artistic pieces using the Oculus Rift. They will learn the different opportunities posed by creating in a virtual world and how this compares to real world creations. After creating their pieces, students will learn about different ways that they can share their art with others and the intellectual property implication of different sharing methods.